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. capitalism is predicated on unlimited growth, but we live in a finite environment and we seem to have a dysfunctional democracy unable to resolve that contradiction. how do you see climate change and our diminishing natural resources such as fossil fuels and water impacting this crisis in capitalism? >> capitalism is a system geared up to doing three things on the part of business: get more profits, grow your company and get a larger market share. those are the driving bottom line issues. corporations are successful or not if they succeed in getting these objectives met. that's what their boards of directors are chosen to do, that's what their shareholders expect. that's the way the system works. if along the way they have to sacrifice either the well-being of their workers or the well-being of the planet or the environmental conditions, they may feel very bad about it, and i know plenty of them who do. but they have no choice. and they will explain if they're honest that that's the way this system works. so we have despoiled our environment in a classic way. that's why we have huge c
and the environment. we can do these projects, prevents these projects will stop a lot of jobs from being created, it is not going to make a development in global emissions. it making no sense to me and the economy. neil: malia. >> i just quickly top say, i understand how we like to take things and combine themm but, i do not think that the only reason why keystone project is not happening is because, barack obama asked his agency this question, to get back to original topic, what i think is really important for us to look forward and you know neil, i don't think that anyone would disagree with you that jobs are important, the problem with laser beam focus you have a society and a lot of things that need to be focused on, laser beaming becomes narrowing, i don't think that is how we' our president or anyone in congress to just have like this one bullet silver bullet solution on what will save the u.s., that is not only thing that u.s. nee right now, we not only have a jobs problem. neil: i think it should be your highest priority. >> it is important for us to look -- >> okay, i understand. >> i d
's a real big play. i'd love to know how citi holdings is doing in this rising environment. >> there's a lot to like. i like citi here and there you have the opening bell here. visa celebrating five years of trading on the nyse and at the nasdaq, the academy of nutrition and dietetics celebrating national nutrition month. >> by the way, speaking of banks and refinancing, the american consumer continues to refinance their household debt either through a refi of their actual home or taking out another credit card with a zero balance or low-balance offer and transferring the balance. visa was a $69 stock two years ago and it's opening today at about $159, right? >> look at that gain. in a market where people are still weak and we still have a tough consumer. >> remember, big international play. >> yes. much more so than ma. >> and it's just a very well-run company. >> a lot of american guys who have been good and have also been run by a foreign individual, and i don't mean to be phonetic, but this is a big worldwide company. >> i changed banks recently because my bank ceased banking so i got a
choices. we're doing burgers in a different way in a new fast casual cooked environment. >> how much of a challenge is it when you come over here when horse meat is big in the news. >> food supply is really important. it's something we all have to face. we're using certified angus meat in the united states and we'll be using that here in europe and it's something we'll do a good job of keeping our eyes on. >> what do you think is smashburger's edge? we've been winning great food awards around the world. we tapped into this fast casual business model where you walk up and order and we bring the food to your table for you with a real nice fork and plate and offer $8 to $10 equivalent in the u.s. >> it's a higher price point, a different customer and hopefully better margins. what are your profit margins like and where do you want to see them go? >> we focus on getting the business of burgers right. our margins are approaching 20% which is really leading in the restaurant industry. we're doing well north of a million dollars out of our restaurants and we're doing it for less than half a
will be a long-term problem. ashley: as long as this goes on, doug, we talk about the goldilocks environment but it is exactly what it is. it is not too hot to prompt the fed to pull back on its qe. but it is not too cold to push the economy into a recession. so kind of of in this same environment. how long do you think this could last? >> i don't buy the goldilocks analogy because we are in a low to zero growth. fourth quarter gdp in the u.s. is still zero. corporate profits in the third quarter were negative. we're slightly positive now. but first quarter consensus is negative again. where is goldilocks? only the fed stimulus, the fed is protecting a really tight monetary stance by u.s. congress, raising taxes, and, no, i don't see goldilocks at all. tracy: goldilocks is arguably uncle ben, right? he is not going anywhere anytime soon, right? i could make a argument, sell in may, do away thing doesn't count this year. >> i agree with that one, uncle ben. i hadn't heard that before. ultimately it i is pushing on a string. you need to have private economy, you need u.s. corporations, you nee
need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >>> all right. welcome >>> all right. welcome back, everybody. first up, last week, president obama told a tv interviewer he didn't have immediate debt crisis. or we in america don't have an immediate debt crisis. and this weekend speaker boehner said basically the same thing. >> we do not have an immediate debt crisis. but we all know that we have one looming. >> all right. you know what, i think they both could be right. i don't think we have an immediate debt crisis. i like to see more growth, not just debt root canal. oh, my god, i said it. that's, by the way, why the business round table of american ceos is pushing hard for a lower, more competitive, more pro-growth 25% corporate tax rate. so let's talk about this. steve forbes, judd gregg, jared bernstein, still with us. all right, steve forbes, look, i have -- i want to balance the budge
and noisy environments because of how it works with your ear's own anatomy. (testimonial section) (testimonial section) (testimonial section) (testimonial section) (testimonial section) did you know, 94% of people who use lyric would recommend lyric to a friend or loved one. can your hearing aid do all this? lyric can. to learn more about lyric's advanced technology, call or visit trylyric.com for a risk--free 30--day trial off. you'll also get a free informational dvd and brochure. why wait? hear today what a little lyric can do for you. get the hearing aid that can. lyric from phonak. lyric can. ♪ be. stuart: we told you that the twinkie would live on. the company that bought the brand is leaving the union picture. bill, welcome back. good to see you again. i think that unions have taken a black guy with the twinkie. they have gotten some of the blame for the twinkie going under. they brought that money and because the unions are not part of the picture. unions took a black guy. >> that was kind of interesting. you say they took some of the blame. exceptionally open-minded of
continues to be the case. i think that we're in a very low interest rate environment that continues to create this wealth effect and the money continues to go to the stock. >> got to leave it there, ben. thank you so much for your time today. >> thank you. >> want to show people quickly what's happening in gold and copper. copper is selling off. we talked briefly about china on the program, but the message should be it's not about a country of 1 million of 0.2% of zero gdp. it's about china and whether global growth jitters are coming back to the fore. with that in mind, we'll hand you over to "squawk box." thank you so much for tuning in. have a great day and hope to see you back here tomorrow.
, job growth will continue to be over 2,000. and i think in that kind of environment, the fed will start to taper the pace of qe. sometimes in q3 and, yes, by the end of this year, i expect the qe to stop. but rates will be very low and the fed's balance sheet will be bloated for quite a long time. >> given the issues in europe, why take the risk? why even hint to markets that they may be exiting? or paps why not leave the accommodative can policies in place to help support the global economy? >> as we move into the summer, i think at that point the cost of this continued open ended deposit continues. i think they've come to the conclusion they don't need it as much. i think at that point, europe will probably be a little more stable. >> joe, in a word, jobless claims today, then, critically important. >> very important. i think they'll stay well below 350. >> it's an important level to watch. appreciate your time. from thank you, kelly. >> thank you for joining us on the show today. i'm kelly evans. this has been "worldwide exchange." time now for "squawk box" in the u.s. remember, peop
, then you hit the financial offshore of the environment. the choice should be obvious to the majority, at least to the european monetary union. >> and most people would assume before depositors were ever looked at as a source of cash, it would be the bondholders that got hit. if cyprus has to raise 67 billion and there's only 1.7 billion in bonds to go after, that won't solve the problem. should they still, though, have tried it? >> i think the natural way to proceed is first feed equity, then junior debt and then senior debt and, last, depositors. and that would very last insure the depositors. so yes, indeed. as you rightly pointed out, it's around 11.7 of which the majority is bailin. but the senior debt is just around 300 million, not billion, for the three largest banks. so it's very, very little. >> and angel gorria in that interview was saying next time or in general, someone has to pay and it should be the critters. nevertheless, antonio has to leave us. thank you for your time. we want to get back out to julia. now that russia has basically said, you know, sorry, no, the pres
quite a distance in a threatening environment. it's he very black out here, dark, and steep and brushy and there are coyotes in the background. >> harris: oh, my gosh, she was only nine, i mentioned that. by the time the emergency crews got it the crash, her dad was dead and that girl was taken to the hospital with minor injuries. and federal agents carrying out a massive sweep in california looking for laughing gas, raiding more than a dozen businesses suspected in a nitrous oxide ring. otherwise known as laughing gas. and users inhale the laughing gas to try to get a cheap and dangerous high. >> we have armed robberies conducted by gangs stealing the gas from each other, it can be taken home or to a large underground party, balloons are sold, $3, $10 a pop. and a lot of money to be made. >> and they took gas street value, 20 million dollars. >> a driver shot and killed outside of papa john's pizza. on this fox trip across america. oklahoma, police say the victim was unloading pizza dough from the back of his truck when his partner, who was in the restaurant, heard what sounded like a
, but looking at the action, right now suggests we're still in a fairly healthy environment. melissa: you are the first person i have heard say that today. even though we had a down day, shows a little bit of strength in the market because it wasn't even weaker based on this news? speak i think it could have been weaker, and a lot of my looking to buy the dip. two days of weakness. i'm not here to forecast what every wiggle in the market is going to be nor do we think investors should, but with part of your question is fed should investors get in, i am very fond of believing and saying get in or get out, that is gambling on a motive in time, should be a process over time. i do think there is a lot of underinvested investors in the equity on the fence looking for this. you get the money looking into by very quickly. melissa: you're both very fantastic, we really appreciate your time. melissa: here is the "money" question of the day, are you worried this could have been to other countries? you can follow me on twitter. all right, should you be going for the gold? many experts say the gold g
about being a woman in this environment, in this lean in time that cheryl sandberg talked about, and, you know, just overall what your views are. >> it's not something i think about a lot. with sherylout now, it is interesting to think about. i think that there's no difference between male and female ceos, and i think it's nice to get attention from a female ceo, but i would rather be recognized as a ceo. shibani: it was on this day in business back in 1894 that the very first stanley cup championship took place. the trough my was awarred to montreal defeating the ottawa generals, and it's passed on every year, and current holders are the l.a. kings. the trophy was named after then governor general of canada, lord stanley presston, and last year, nearly 3 million people in the united states tuned in to watch the finals and the average ticket price of the first game was $833, and by game five, the price went up to more than a thousand dollars a ticket. well, it's the oldest trough my competed for by pofessional at athletes in north america, and it was played today, march 22, 119 years
's environment where interest rates, in general, are so low, why take a chance? you know, it's not just on that side of the atlantic. you know, we got 0% interest rates in america. why leave money on deposit in a bank to get 0% when there's inflation, and, you know, nose are the two largest banks in cypress that failed. our two largest banks, bank of america and citi bank have over $2 trillion in total deposits. the fdic has near $25 billion in treasuries. if our largest banks were to fail, we don't have anywhere near reserves to come close to the insurance deposits let alone all deposits. sandra: let's get jordan in here, an analyst in our power panel tonight. jordan, i guess this here is going to be used -- this bailout will be used as a template for future bailouts, and that investors say, well, my money's not safe, i'm going to take it and go somewhere else. do you believe that to be the case? >> right. no, not currently just because when i look at the global markets, if you review the major european nations like germany or france, you don't see the dee tier ration that there's -- d
will be multiple expansion. we're selling 13 and a half, 14 times 2013 earnings. in a low interest-rate environment that is very cheap. we can easily get up to 15, 16, even 17 and not be out of line with historical experience. i think it is multiple expansion that is going to be the key because, again, we know there are $10 trillion in money funds or in bank accounts earning nothing. people are eventually going to say, hey, i am going to go get some of that dividend income. i am going to move back. it has only been done little but so far. we could see a much bigger movement and one that i think is fully justified by the fundamentals behind the market. david: are you surprised more money has not come out of the bond fund? there has been a lot of money going into stock fund, but there has not been a big drop-off, frankly not at all, of money in bond funds. why not? >> i think, again, a lot of people cling to the bond funds because if their is a crisis, like we saw in greece, the treasury market possible little bit. if you hold treasury's you can look at those and say, that cushioned the decline in th
russian stock for eight last 18 years for a very limped time. the environment they operate in is not what we're looking for sustainable growth over a period of time. lauren: so many of these emerging markets have rampant corruption. last week i was in vietnam. i was in cambodia. that is all i heard. so as an investor do you want to go into a government where the company has to, pay money here and there to get what they want done? >> no, you don't. and not that even in our own country this has never happened before, as it has. but you have to be selective. there's a lot of lack of transparency in the russian market and the chinese market. there is issues in the indian market as well but there are still companies with great corporate governance that have a long operating history of providing shareholders with the kind of returns that help them achieve --. david: the problem you're company peting with investors like chinese investors who are willing to bribe and the chinese are everywhere in these emerging markets. >> well they are, and it is sad if you looked at the situation with sino fore
of ceos talking about the lack of clarity in the global environment. i know a lot of the digital marketing dollars right now are based in the u.s. but these numbers seem pretty bullish to me. do you feel better or more cautious than last quarter when you look out at the rest of the year from here? >> jon, i think the macro trend is more spend is going to go digital. and when people talk about big data, we're the big data company for marketers. so as you talk about the hundreds of billions of dollars, where people are going to want to know what the return of investment is, there is no other company that's as well positioned as adobe, to really let them know how to spend that money and to accurately reflect what the return of investment is. so we think that the macro trends will fuel this business for many years. >> so what would be an appropriate growth -- yes, what would be an appropriate growth rate, then, for adobe? obviously, your stock is trading higher in the extended hours. a lot of people very pleased with the earnings results that we saw. is this sustainable, this year and next? wh
life could have, indeed, once existed there. >> for the first time we are seeing an ancient environment on mars which is habitable. it just looks different than the planet does today instead of red, it's gray. there was plenty of water. >> curiosity landed on mars back in august, you might recall. the mission last one martian year. that translates into 687 earth days, shepard. we're about halfway through. >> shepard: all right. casey stegall in dallas tonight. cabin owners are now looking for what's left after a huge fire ripped through a mountain side resort. and that tops our news across newark. america. tennessee, the fire broke out late sunday night at a cabin near the north carolina border. heavy winds quickly fanned the flames to dozens of other structures. black hawk helicopters help battled thing all day yesterday. officials say some rain fall last night finally helped contain the thing. it charred some 200 acres and destroyed more than 60 cabins. nobody hurt. maryland. a massive water main break beneath a busy intersection north of d.c. the pipe burst last night sending water 2
and are starting to increase dividends. an increase in the interest rate environment for the banks would be positive for the bottom line. shibani: ralph, what about you? anything you're staying away from and you wouldn't touch with a 10 foot pole? >> i mentioned it before the emerging markets have been lagging. i think it is too early to buy into emerging markets. i think part of that problem is the fact that there is a question about growth and, as a result of that, you have a lot of the commodity not doing very, very well like steel and copper and things like that. i think i would avoid that for a while. shibani: all right, ralph and jim, thank you very much for joining us today. david: thanks, gentlemen. happy weekend. >> thank you. >> you too. shibani: leaders of the european union are locked in bailout talks as the clock wind down for the country to raise 5.8 billion euros in order to receive a much-needed bailout. we'll go live to the heart of all the action to cyprus. david: how many people would buy that country right now, speaking of cyprus, the idea of confiscating people's inc
environment. >> i am glad you brought up the fact that you're dealing with the c.r.'s. it has been suggested that this is on you. let's take the timeout the last three years. was it your idea to pass a 14- day continuing resolution or a 21-day continuing resolution? or a seven-day, 165-day, a one- day, a six-day? how you run a government or a branch of government with c.r.'s that go for that short amount of time? how do you adequately budget for that? >> it is very difficult. we err on the side of being conservative, as we have here, to make sure we are not deficient at the end of any given continuing resolution. it is difficult. we are a very large operation. we are taking in over 400,000 people a year. and if it has to go on for the full year. when you are in an environment where you do not know what your budget is going to be on the various marks and the house and the senate are different, when you are looking at sequestration, it is a challenge and you do your best under the circumstances to come up with the right answer. >> as you went through the releases and you sit here today, do you
to cost them a lot more money and have little benefit on the environment. back in 2008, president obama made this statement: "will america watch as clean energy jobs and industry of the future flourish in countries like spain, japan, and germany?" that's what he said. we need to emulate spain, japan and germany. but spain right now is having to cut back dramatically on its really forward-leaning green mandates. they went probably further or as far as any country in europe. it's been a total disappointment. they are reducing their subsidies. their economy is in shambles, and they're not doing well. "the financial times," just february of this year wrote this -- quote -- "the spanish government's latest bid to cut its growing debts to the country's energy sector is expected to slash profits at renewable energy companies asthma tkreud continues to -- as madrid continues to grapple with a $37 billion deficit built up through the years of subsidies." they go on to say "in akiona, spain's second largest wind power operator, shares in that company have tumbled almost 20% with analysts expect t
you'll see a depressed environment where the unemployment rate is over 26%, severe austerity cuts and overhauls of gutted worker benefits, safety net programs, harming seniors and the country's poorest populous, taxes on families an businesses have increased at a sharp rate and violent social unrest has become common place. most recently we've seen a proposal to bail out cyprus banks that could raid the savings account of its own population. these are the realities of debt-ridden countries. these are the realities of liberal policies that tax too much, spend too much, borrow too much and produce far too few jobs. we cannot afford the path that we're on. thankfully we have time to change. america's course and the house republican budget provides a so-year plan. it puts brakes on our spending levels, laying out a thoughtful program, reforms to ensure successful government services are solvent for generations to come, prioritizes a comprehensive restructuring of or tax code to simplify the system and improbables our fiscal system in a way -- improves our fiscal system in way that wou
, not really. if i got compliance. >> can you at least tell us in this environment, the fed looks like the one thing we've learn side more cover for the fed. i don't know how bad it gets in cypress or whether there is contagion, but the fed will go. >> i think from the u.s. economic perspective, in the last few years of summer slowdowns, it doesn't look like that will happen and we're waiting for pullbacks and maybe we're waiting for an opportunity, but it will be time to wait for equities if you get that. >> i think cramer's here and jim, remember early on we were talking about whether the market knows things and it's like we were looking at that big job's number and we didn't talk about it after it happened and we got six or seven straight new highs and a fiscal cliff. is this what we're seeing today, enough to put anything on hold in your view or do things still look pretty good for our markets here. we did have a series and when you look at the charts this weekend, i cannot believe how many straight ups and take a boeing and it is bad news that indonesia did not go with boeing and that sto
important is being present in the work environment. making better decisions for the organization. depending where you are in the company, they take a longer time to have an impact. we will see that over time. that's the importance of having mindfulness and a personal practice in the workplace at every level in the company. >> mark, you do yoga yourself as well? >> yes, i do. every morning. >> i was telling becky and andrew about your personal style. your ski accident, broken neck, falling down ravine and spending a year on painkillers until you discovered yoga, meditation, acupunctu acupuncture. tell us a little bit about that personal journey. >> well, i think until i had to find my way through a health care system that's really not a system and had to struggle with a debilitating neuropathy. i have it. terrible pain down my left arm all day long. the medical system gave me drugs. the disability system told me to go on long-term disability. they told me that the best hope for me was to live a reasonable good existence on disability payments and to deal with my pain, to focus on my pain. wh
't it be the people in the most fragile work environments? won't it be the people with less skills? won't they be the ones that would suffer the most? don't we have an obligation as a united states senate to reach out to the house and say we get it, this is dangerous. we don't know for sure where we're going, but we know shame on us if we allow decent, hard-working people struggling to get by right now to get hammered by another fiscal crisis that erskine bowles and alan simpson virtually guaranteed was on the way. i think we have a duty. i think we have a responsibility. i think when the american people find out it's not going to take massive slashing of spending, as our colleagues say, a lot of the programs that we can get can be more efficient than they have ever been, and we get just as much benefit even if they don't get as much money. there hadn't been any reform, any management improvements in this government in decades. i will just say politically i thought that was the greatest offer that governor romney had. he was a very good manager. in my opinion, we have had enough speech
this morning, this shows incremental softness in i.t. spending environment. that's weighing on all tech names. ibm is down 1.25%. that's a huge weight on s&p 500 at this hour. a lots of them we are watching in the tech sector. s.a.p. down 2.5%. crm down 1%. it is taking everything down at this point. >> oracle was bad. can't mince words about it. >> was oracle being bad a sign of what's bad in overall tech spending or was oracle bad more of a sign of what's bad at oracle? or both? >> it is a big government provider. dell is, too. that's hurt dell. this was sloppy execution. deliver, deliver, deliver. are they losing share in the cloud? clearly. they won too many nine-figure deals. at the same time the market says i want to buy that weakness. why is lululemon up? they want to buy that weak fles. looking for caterpillar to bottom today. onshore drillers, one of the weakest markets, he should buy those. things come down, people just want to buy them. >> do you agree with this 1% move on lululemon today? >> that it is up? no. i don't like lululemon. talk about bad execution. they've just been ter
a difficult environment, cameron international, an equipment player, has an enormous backlog. just last week, got a big order from petro. that's one where we expect substantial earnings growth each of the next several years. >> what else? keep it going while we have time. >> keep it going. in addition to that, we're hopeful for edwards life science. it's been a little more controversial. that's the catheter delivered heart valve. there's been debate about the pace of the launch of that. it's at a lower point now. we think expectations are probably more appropriate. and the stock is attractive. that one is also that we have good expectations for. additionally, in the technology space we have pretty good sized positions in google which is perked up on a year to date basis but we think is getting back on track. 12 months ago that was fairly controversial. it's not nearly so controversial now. >> all right. greg, you don't know offhand whether any of those companies are -- have open board seats, do you? >> no, i don't. i'm not aware of that. >> okay. just wondering. >> you have the science backg
it into this social environment where you're users are engaging with the content. >> and then there's bill simmons, one of the star pundits of espn, doing live webcasts on youtube with friends. you get to hear his thoughts on the game in realtime. espn didn't sell ads, admitting this is a test run. they've committed zero dollars to ncaa rights and it's a low cost production. easy money. >> that is a business model right there. >>> a lot more still to come. tweet time. could texas be getting ready to hoard some gold? lawmaker wanting them to allow the state and texans to store gold at its own facility with protection of the state. if passed, texas would be the first state to have its own ft. knox, essentially, allow ting it to be protected by the tenth andment. if your home state could make its own protected depository for anything, what would it be and why? tweet us at squawk street and we'll get you responses in the next hour. >> in the meantime, interrupt. i believe we know why the markets have turned south. the head of the eurozone group, what we've seen in cyprus is now a template for future b
protection of the poorest and the environment. he said the role of pope is to quote, open his arms and protect all of humanity. those are the headlines. back now to tracy. tracy: i think he is cool, patti ann browne. thank you. >> thank you, tracy. tracy: we have breaking news of after all the back and forth and facilitating all day, cyprus parliament rejects tax on bank deposits for a international bailout. 36 votes against and 19 abstained. who knows where it will keep going. the story keeps going. adam: waiting for the russians. tracy: exactly. treasury secretary jack lew on a critical mission to china. earlier today he met with china's new president to talk cybersecurity and more. peter barnes in washington with details. hey, peter. >> tracy, that's right. cybersecurity is at the top of the agenda the new treasury secretary around the new president of china. just last month the private security firm mandy apt, tied the chinese military to cyber attacks on more than 140 u.s. companies. analysts describe the meetings in beijing as a get acquainted session that will set the table
Search Results 0 to 39 of about 40 (some duplicates have been removed)